Gas Courses

gas courses

Now I would like to discuss with you gas courses, the Gas Register and what you need to become a Gas Service Technician, it’s a great career to be involved in but it does come with responsibilities as I’ll discuss later. So read on for more info.

What is the Gas Safe Register?

By law here in the UK you must be listed on the gas safe register in order to carry out any gas work and this is for not only the UK but also for Guernsey and the Isle of Man. Any mistakes involving gas can be deadly so it’s crucial that the person you’re hiring to carry out gas work either in your home or business premises is fully qualified and is on the Gas safe Register.

Gas engineers work on cookers, boilers, fires and all other types of gas appliances. The Gas Safe Register is the registration body that covers gas here in the UK, Isle of Man and Guernsey and is appointed by the local health and safety authority. It is law that all gas engineers are registered. The Gas Safe Register replaced CORGI in 2009.

The purpose of the Gas Safe Register is to keep on maintaining and improving gas safety at the highest level possible. The gas safe register makes sure that all those who work with gas are safe to do so and are on the list. There are over 120,000 people qualified to work with gas.

The Gas Safe Register protects the general public from unsafe gas workers by:

  • Having a team carrying out national investigations that will track down any gas worker who is currently working illegally and is not on the register
  • They regularly inspect those who are registered as gas sage engineers
  • They educate the consumers and try and raise awareness of gas safety
  • They investigate any reports of someone working illegally with gas
  • The Gas Safe Registered is there to protect people and families form illegal gas workers.

Level 3 Diploma and the ACS safety assessment

A Level 3 Diploma will cover all the ACS safety assessment requirements you’ll need if you’re planning on working with gas. You will need to cover the ACS safety assessment in your training/course in order to register yourself with the Gas Safe Register. The Gas Safe Register was formally known as CORGI. You will greatly boost your working portfolio if you do register with the Gas Safe Register as more and more people will come to you for work rather than going for someone who isn’t registered with the Gas Safe Register. They will feel much more confident in your skills and safety knowledge if they see that you are registered.

Domestic ACS Gas safety courses

If you are entering back into the gas industry, maybe you haven’t been involved with it for a while or if you are a registered gas engineer and are looking to renew your domestic ACS certificate then there are many courses available for you in order to keep you well qualified and also to broaden your skill portfolio.

So the Domestic ACS Gas safety courses are great if:

  • You’re a domestic gas engineer who needs to renew their ACS certificate
  • If you are planning on adding gas appliances for domestic usage
  • You are going to install gas meters
  • Are an emergency service provider
  • Are carrying out carbon monoxide testing

Commercial Heating ACS Gas Safety Courses

These courses are great if you’re an engineer with experience.

This course is perfect if:

  • You’re an engineer and already have a domestic qualification and have a good level of experience
  • Maybe you are renewing your commercial qualifications and need the Core Commercial Heating Gas Safety package
  • Maybe you already have a domestic qualification and are looking to work in the commercial environment.

To become a gas service technician

A gas service technician can install, repair and service gas appliances and heating systems. These may involve boilers, fires, and cookers and also central heating systems and shower units. To enter into this career you’ll need an industry recognised qualification and a gas safe registration which was formally known as CORGI. In order to gain these you may have to be employed by a company.

A gas service technician will usually work in a customer’s home or business premises for example a cafe, restaurant or in a hotel’s kitchen for instance.

A gas service technician’s job may involve:

  • Installing systems and appliances
  • Carrying out any maintenance checks on equipment and systems
  • Make sure all controls and safety devices are in good working order and are safe to use
  • Find and repair any gas leeks, you find these by using computerised fault finding equipment
  • Repair or replace any old or faulty parts
  • Order any new parts
  • Keep a record of the jobs you have carried out
  • Provide customers with how to be safe with gas appliances

You will also have to provide customers with quotes for any potential jobs that are to be carried out and advise them on how long the job will take to do. Gas service technicians are also known as gas installation engineers or gas maintenance engineers.

Working hours

A gas service technician will usually work between the hours of 8am to 5pm and that’s Mondays to Fridays. Some employers do offer 24 hour emergency call outs, so keep this in mind.

The majority of the work will be in a customer’s home or business premises. This job can be quite demanding physically and you may have to work in cramped conditions and also sometimes up heights.

How much could you earn?

Apprentices with British Gas could earn around £15,000 a year and the more qualified gas technicians could earn between £25,000 and £30,000 a year. Of course these figures could be more as there will added bonuses, overtime and shift allowances.

How do I get qualified?

So to become a fully qualified gas service technician you will need two things:

  • To have a recognised gas industry qualification
  • To have a Gas Safe Registration (formally known as CORGI)

Gas industry qualifications that are recognised include:

  • Level 3 (NVQ) in Domestic Natural GAS Installation and Maintenance
  • Level 3 Diploma in Gas Utilisation
  • Level 3 (NVQ) Diploma in Domestic Plumbing and Heating (Gas Fired Water and Central Heating Appliances)

So to sum up, to become a gas service technician you must:

  • Have good practical skills
  • Have good communication skills and also good organisation and problem solving skills
  • Have basic IT skills and have good maths skills
  • Have the ability to follow technical layouts and diagrams
  • Be polite, professional and friendly
  • Be able to work well within a team or on your own
  • Have confidence to take responsibility and be able to make decisions
  • Be aware of health and safety and industry regulations.

 

Well that’s it from me, I hope you can see how important this career is, it’s a great career to be involved with but it does come with a high level of responsibility. So let me wish you the best of luck with it all and I hope that someday soon you will be a gas service technician. All the best!

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Tiling Courses

tiling training courses

When considering you’re options as to how to enter into the tiling industry I bet you’ve thought about college courses, apprenticeships and home study courses but have you ever considered training centres? Well this is what I will be telling you all about throughout this article. I’m going to give you all the info you’ll need on training centres and hopefully by the time you finish reading you’ll better understand if they are a suitable option for your needs.

Tilers are in high demand and I’m not just talking about the UK I’m talking about all over the world for example places like Australia, New Zealand and Canada, each of these are good examples of countries that would love to have your expertise and skills in their countries. That’s the thing about gaining skills in the construction industry you’ll know your skills are appreciated and needed wherever you’re living and working. It really is a skill that’s yours for life.

So read on and hopefully you’ll understanding a lot more about tiling courses and training centres by the time you’ve finished reading.

Am I suitable for training in a training centre?

Yes absolutely, everyone who is thinking of a career within the construction industry is the ideal candidate for training centres, if you didn’t already know training centres have been especially designed with the construction industry in mind.

They really want you to fully understand all about your chosen trade which in this case is tiling and they will allow you to be really hands on with the way you’ll be trained up so that you can really appreciate all the jobs a tiler has to carry out throughout the working day.

Skilled workers like tillers are very much in demand and that’s why training centres are such a popular route into different trades. They offer so much flexibility that absolutely anyone can train up this way for their chosen trade.

Training centres are found all over the country so I bet there’s one close to where you are and if not maybe it’s just a short distance away, if however you find that your nearest is a fair way away then maybe consider the option of staying close to the training centre for the duration of your studies.

Maybe you have a friend who lives close by and you can stay with them or there’s the option of staying in a b & b for the training duration.

Either way you’ll be saving on travelling which will mean more time for your training plus you’ll also have the bonus of not paying for travelling expenses.

To start your training you don’t need to have any formal qualifications and you can begin your training whenever you’re ready.

Your training will consist of theory and practical, the theory all takes place in the classrooms, which are all fully air conditioned for extra comfort for you and the practical will all take place in the workshops.

You’ll be trained up and guided by experts at the tiling trade who will train you up to the highest of standards that meet with industry recognised qualifications so that by the time your tiling training ends you’ll have a full understanding of the tiling trade and how to carry out jobs safely and efficiently.

One thing to do before you sign up with a training centre is to make sure they have been accredited by a governing body for example City & Guilds. Once you successfully complete your training you’ll be awarded with your tiling certificate and this is your proof that you have met with the industry regulations and that you have the skills and expertise to carry out a job successfully.

Training centres offer great flexibility!

If you have other commitments in your life for example family or a job then sometimes you just cannot even think about full time training for another career. Well this is why training centres are so popular, yes you can go for the full time option which will usually see you trained up in 4 to 8 weeks or there’s the part time option.

So if this is you and you really want to train up for another career whilst carrying on with your other commitments then go for the part time option you can take your time without the worry. With the part time option you really can take your time and can spread your training over months and even years if you like.

Training centres are available Mondays to Fridays and are also available on weekends and evenings, so as you can see they really do make it easy for you to get your training in when you have the available time.

Training centres boast all the latest mod cons and like I mentioned earlier you have the added benefit of air conditioned classrooms making learning so much more comfortable.

The best thing about training centres is the way they fully encourage you to really get hands on at your chosen trade, they want you to dive straight in and really get to grips with what actually goes on in the working life of skilled people. They want you to be prepared for your trade both in knowledge but also practically too. You’ll begin your training at the very beginning and then work your way up the scale.

It would be a good idea if when you begin your training you start looking for a work placement in fact industry organisations all agree that this is really important as you will gain extra practical knowledge that will help you greatly with the practical parts of your diploma. Discuss this with your training centre or local college they may be able to help you find a work placement.

If you are already working in the tiling trade but don’t currently hold any qualifications then you have the option of having your knowledge and skills assessed by current industry standards. As you complete different tasks you’ll be assessed and then depending how you do, and you could gain some tiling qualifications.

Where the magic happens!

You’ll learn all about the tiling industry in the air conditioned classrooms and also you’ll learn about health and safety and all the underpinning you’ll need to know for the tiling industry.

Your expert will demonstrate to you how to carry out different jobs and explain what a tiler does in their working day. Understanding health and safety is really important especially before you enter into the workshop where all the magic happens. Yes the magic happens right there in the workshop this is where all of that learning can finally be put into practice and you can really see what a tiler’s working life is really all about. All the equipment you need is provided so less worry for you.

Are tiling courses expensive?

It really all depends on how you look at it, yes I guess on first glance they can seem to be a bit steep tiling courses can range anywhere between£4,000 and £6,000, but the thing to point out here is that once you qualify that’s it you’re a fully qualified tiler with knowledge and skills that are so desperately needed. These skills cannot be taken from you they are yours for however long you want to use them for. Tilers earn very good money and the start up cost of the training centre will seem really insignificant once you’re out their earning your wage. It really is an investment on your future as a tiler.

Are long distance courses and short intensive any good?

Yes absolutely and they do have their place, they are a great way of entering into the tiling industry and you’ll learn all the basics.

The thing is however is to make sure you know exactly how much time is given over to practical training and work placements. It’s one thing to understand all the theory but you need a combination of the two, theory and practical.

You don’t want to end up with a lack of practical knowledge and skills that are required for the tiling industry. So as I say they do have their good points but remember to ask about the practical sides of training, this is so very important, also make sure they are accredited by an industry organisation for example City & Guilds.

Well we’ve come to the end now I hope I’ve been of some use to you and that you’ve gained more info on training centres and all that’s involved. It really is a great skill to have and you’ll have a fantastic career ahead of you. So all the best and I hope it all works out for you!

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Tiling Qualifications

Tiling Qualifications

Becoming a tiler is a great career move with job satisfaction and if you love carrying out practical tasks then tiling is right up your street, as a tiler you’ll be covering floors and walls with tiles on a wide range of locations including people’s homes, business premises, hotels, restaurants, hospitals, the list is endless really. As a tiler you can also specialise in swimming pools and mosaic walls that are found in landscaped gardens.

As a tiler you must be able to work accurately and be well organised and also have the ability to calculate costs and quantities for when you’re ordering or buying your materials for the jobs you’ll be carrying out.

To start out on the road to tiling you could become a labourer and then you’ll be able to get trained up by your employer to go further up the tiling ladder. Construction courses are another great route into the tiling industry where you’ll gain all the theory knowledge as well as practical skills. Another route into the tiling industry is via an apprenticeship scheme where you’ll be trained up by an expert at their trade who will get you up to the highest of standards that’s needed for a career in the tiling industry.

A tiler’s work!

A tiler carries out a wide range of jobs including:

  • Cutting the tiles to shape and size with bench mounted tools or hand cutters
  • Marking out locations so that you can estimate the number of tiles that will be needed for the job and also work out the amount of adhesive that will be required this is known as setting out
  • Fixing the tiles and then applying the grout before you finish the work
  • Preparing the surfaces the tiles are being placed on using, cement, plaster, or sand.

Some jobs a tiler carries out may involve them having to remove or repair the previous surface that the tiles are going to be placed on before you can proceed with the setting out stage.

A tiler works with many types of building materials including:

 

  • Glass
  • Terracotta
  • Ceramics
  • Granite
  • Stone
  • Marble

How many hours a week does a tiler work?

A tiler would usually be expected to work between 37 and 45 hours a week and that’s including Mondays to Fridays. Sometimes you may be required to work overtime to finish contract deadlines.

Remember that tiling is very exhausting as it is physically demanding because it does involve working with heavy loads. You will be required to wear protective gear especially when working with grout and adhesives.

Tilers travel from site to site and sometimes they may be required to stay overnight away from home on certain jobs.

How much can you earn as a tiler?

Qualified tillers can earn between £17,000 and £23,000 a year, trainee tillers can earn up to £14,000 a year but a trainee’s earning can vary depending on who’s training you up.

The more experienced tiler can look forward to earning between £25,000 and £30,000 a year. Experienced tillers include tillers who have supervisory and also training duties.

Of course these figures will vary considerably depending on bonuses, overtime, shift allowances and of course the part of the country you’re working in.

The closer you are to London and the South East will see wages much higher than these mentioned here. So if you are living and working in the London area then you can look forward to wages much, much higher than these. If you’re planning on becoming a self employed tiler then you have the added bonus of being able to set your own rates.

Entry Requirements For Becoming A Tiler

You don’t need any formal qualifications to become a tiler but it would be great if you do have some previous experience with working on site as most employers will be looking out for this previous experience. To get this on site experience you could start out as a labourer and the once you get started your employer may offer you some training.

You can also gain this on site experience via a tiling apprenticeship scheme with a tiling company or a building firm.

Apprenticeship places are limited and competition is fierce and there is an age limit too, you should ideally be between the ages of 16 and 24.

You could also consider a training course or college course and while you’re completing your course you could also try and find a work placement. The course will include:

  • Level 1 Award/certificate in Construction Skills (Floor and wall tiling)
  • Level 1 certificate in construction and building (fitted interiors)
  • Level 1 Diploma in wall and floor tiling

Further development and training once you become a tiler

As soon as you start working as a tiler you would be training on the job with block or day release at your local training centre or local college. This way you can aim for tiling qualifications including:

Level 2 Extended Diploma in Wall and floor tiling

Level 2/3 Diploma in wall and floor tiling

Level 2/3 (NVQ) certificate /Diploma in wall and floor tiling (construction)

These qualifications will include units involving:

  • Setting out
  • Mosaic finishes
  • Positioning and fixing wall and floor tiles
  • Preparing surfaces

Construction Skills Certification Scheme (CSCS)

There are many building contractors that require you to have a CSCS card. This card is your proof that you have all the training and skills that are required for working on a construction site. To get your CSCS card you must:

Pass the CITB health, safety and environment test

Prove that you are fully competent at working on a construction site and have all the necessary knowledge and training. You can prove this by the qualifications that you already have.

If you are currently working as a tiler but don’t have any qualifications to get your CSCS card then you can use the on site assessment workshop or experienced worker practical assessment schemes. Once you do this you will hopefully gain a qualification and then go on to qualify for your CSCS card.

To recap!

So to sum up here’s what you’ll need to become a good tiler:

  • An ability to follow designer’s plans
  • Have good practical skills and knowledge
  • Have good maths skills for calculating costs
  • Have good attention to detail
  • Have good accuracy
  • Have creative flair
  • Have a good eye of design
  • Be able to work closely as part of a team
  • Be able to work on your own
  • Have good customer service skills
  • Be aware of health and safety at all times
  • Have the ability to keep paperwork
  • Have the ability to keep accounts up to date if you’re a self employed tiler

So there we are then, I’ve come to the end of my article on tiling qualifications I do hope I’ve helped you gain more info on the life of a tiler and the qualifications you need to become one and go even further up the scale.

Tiling is a good choice of career with very good prospects. So I’ll be off now but before I go let me wish you the best of luck with your training to become a tiler!

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Tiling Apprenticeship Schemes

tiling apprenticeships

Becoming a tiler either self employed or working for a team is a fantastic opportunity that boasts good income, job satisfaction, and you’ll gain skills that are required all over the world and of course here in the UK. We desperately need tillers, so if you’re thinking of becoming a tiler read on for information on how to become one via an apprenticeship scheme.

You’ll love tiling if you like carrying out practical tasks and are good at planning and organising. One of the best things about working in the construction industry is that once you qualify you’re guaranteed a job for life as your trade will always be in demand. Peace of mind comes with knowing that your skill is highly regarded and indeed needed.

Apprenticeship schemes are usually best suit for those who are in between the ages of 16 and 24 or for those who have just left school.

Apprentice’s are trained up by an expert at their trade which in this case would be a fully qualified tiler and it’s their job to get you trained up to the highest of standards so that once your training is over you will meet with the current industry qualifications. They are there to help and support you through your training and guide you all the way to the point where you’ll gain your certificate in tiling.

Can you imagine how much knowledge and skills your boss would have picked up along their own tiling career, this is why becoming an apprentice is such a fantastic way of entering into the tiling industry. Your boss will be passing down all the knowledge and skills they have gained to you and that’s why you must make sure to grab this chance with both hands it’s an opportunity that doesn’t happen for many.

There are just so many bonuses that come with being an apprentice and a big bonus is the fact that you’ll be meeting and greeting lots of tradesmen, construction workers and also suppliers. These people could potentially in the future help you with your career when you start up as a tiler with your own business (if you go self employed)

Not everyone who is training to become a tiler either by a college course or via training centres get this chance to meet with all these people, so you have a head start over them straight away. That’s another reason why apprenticeships are so popular you really do get the chance to get to grips with your trade from the very beginning of your training.

Apprenticeships are divided in two that being theory and practical. Practical of course takes place when you’re out and about working with your boss and then the theory side of training takes place in the classroom at your local college or training centre.

Apprenticeship schemes will normally take between 2 and 4 years to finish.

Don’t forget you’ll be earning a wage too!

As a tiler’s apprentice you’re fully entitled to at least the minimum wage which is currently standing at £2.73 an hour. This is what you’re entitled to if you’re between the ages of 16 and 18. You’ll also receive this amount if you’re aged 19 and over and are in your first year of training. What you’ll receive over these figures will be determined by who you are working for and what extras they are prepared to offer you.

Apprentices are paid for the hours they work so this will be at least 30 hours a week and also for any training that’s part of your apprenticeship, this training is the theory side of your training and takes place in the classroom at your local college or training centre.

You’re entitled to holidays too!

As a tiler’s apprentice you’re also fully entitled to holidays. You’ll receive at least 20 paid holiday days per year and also bank holidays too.

Sounds good, but how do you get on an apprenticeship scheme?

Well for starters you don’t need to have any formal qualifications to start your apprenticeship but you must have the determination to really want to try your hardest. Remember what I said earlier becoming an apprentice is an opportunity not offered to many so you must really want to work hard at it to achieve your end goal of becoming a tiler.

Sadly there are age limits, apprenticeships are usually targeted at those aged 16 to 24 and anyone over these ages will find themselves struggling to get accepted unfortunately. The thing is there are just a limited number of spaces allocated to apprenticeships each year and knowing what a good opportunity it is competition is huge, everyone wanting to enter into the construction industry that are just of school usually goes for apprenticeships.

Another must have to become an apprentice is normal colour vision.

I know this all sounds disheartening if you’re over these ages, but please don’t worry too much it may be a struggle but that doesn’t mean it cannot happen. You could try ringing up a few local tillers and see if they’re planning on taking on apprentices you never know you may be surprised, failing that they may tell you about another tiler who they know is taking on, so it’s always worth a go, you never know your luck.

I’ve tried everything but I just cannot get on an apprenticeship scheme?

I can imagine how disappointing it is not to be able to get on an apprenticeship scheme but please don’t get too disheartened as there are many other routes into the tiling industry. Like I mentioned competition is highly fierce and there are just a few available spaces each year given to apprenticeships. You could take a tiling course at your local college or try a training centre course, these are very good and are extremely hands on and if you take the full time option you could be a fully qualified tiler in just 8 weeks. You’ll be trained up by experts at their trade who are there to guide you throughout your course. There is also the option of home study courses and short intensive courses. It really all depends on your circumstances and how much time you can allocate to training.

If you need further info about apprenticeships!

For much more information about apprenticeships and also how to apply for one the government has a free “national apprenticeship helpline” where you will be provided with much more info and helpful hints and tips. Call 08000150600 and they will be more than happy to advise you on all your questions regarding apprenticeship schemes.

Also available is a website committed to providing info on apprenticeships and you can also receive an information pack. Visit www.apprenticeships.org.uk

So that’s all from me regarding tiling apprenticeship schemes I honestly hope you’ve gained more info about apprenticeships and whether it’s the best option for you. If you do get lucky and are accepted think yourself extremely lucky and make the most of this opportunity and I hope one day you’ll achieve your goal at becoming a qualified tiler. Good luck!

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Painter and Decorator Courses

painter and decorator courses

For people wanting to enter into the construction industry there are many routes in which they can do so, there is the apprentice option, college courses, long distance courses, short intensive courses and then there are training centres.

Training centres are the perfect option for those who want to either get trained up quickly or for those who need the benefit of flexibility that being trained up this way offers. So if you haven’t been able to get on an apprenticeship scheme why not consider training via a training centre.

Maybe you cannot commit yourself to a full time training courses, if this is you then please don’t worry as this is one of the reasons why training centres are so popular, you get to choose the days and times you can put into your training. You may have family commitments for example or maybe you are already in a job and you have to train while you still carry on with your work, again getting trained up via a training centre would be your ideal option if you do have to juggle other commitments.

If you didn’t already know, training centres have been purposely built for the construction industry they really want you to fully experience what being in a certain trade is really all about so that you can be prepared for life in your new career. Training centres are really hands on making the learning experience much more enjoyable for you. You’re simply not just there to read and learn from a text book you really can get all the experience you need under one roof.

Becoming a skilled worker within the construction industry is very exciting and it’s not just because they are all excellent careers to be involved in but also the job security that comes with different trades, we desperately need skilled workers in this country and not just here but all over the world, this is why skilled workers are well paid, to put it simply, we need them and there just isn’t enough of them!

You’ll discover that training centres are located all over the UK so I’m sure you’ll find one reasonably close to where you are based and if not there are many options open to you, you could think about stopping over in a b &b for a spell until you finish your course, this would be an option if you were taking a full time course not so much the part time course, otherwise you’d be spending a fortune. Think about it, as you would be saving on travelling and all the expenses that come with that and it means more time for you to really concentrate on your course.

You don’t need any formal qualifications to train via a training centre and as soon as you’re ready you can begin your training.

Your course will include both theory and practical, the theory will take place in the air conditioned classrooms. Yes you did read right, air conditioned classrooms, to make your learning experience even more enjoyable and comfortable.

You are trained up by experts at their trade which in this case would be painters and decorators who are there to guide and help you all the way from the start of your course right up to the day you walk out of there with a certificate in your hand. You will be trained up so that you get right up to the level that required by industry bodies for example Cit &Guilds. The certificate you’ll receive at the end of your course is your proof that you have completed your course and are fully competent and skilled at your trade.

When you first find a training centre that you’re happy with make sure they have been accredited by an awarding body like City &Guilds.

Training centres work around you’re requirements!

Training centres offer their students great flexibility as I mentioned earlier if you have other commitments and just cannot commit to a full time course you have the part time option available, this way nobody is excluded from training to enter into a skilled job.

The full time option will see that you will finish your course in 4 to 8 weeks and if you take the part time option you have the benefit of being able to spread your course over months and sometimes even years. It depends really on how soon you want to start your new career and of course the other commitments you may already have.

Training centres are open Mondays to Fridays and are also open in the evenings and weekends. This is perfect for those who like I say do have other commitments and maybe can’t get to the training centre in the day and have to do their training in the evenings or on the weekends.

Training centres are very hands on places and allow you to fully appreciate what goes on in your chosen trade. The theory is learned in the air conditioned classrooms and then you move onto the workshops where all the excitement begins and you can put all that you’ve learned into practice.

It has been advised that anyone who starts their training should look for a work placement straight away as this will allow you to gain even more work experience and will help you greatly with the practical parts of your Diploma, discuss this with your college or training centre, they will be more than happy to advise you.

If you are already a painter and decorator but don’t hold any qualifications then why not try and have your skills assessed, you will be assessed for your knowledge and skills and the qualification you’ll gain will depend on your results, but it has to be worth a go!

Theory and practical!

The classroom is where the text book learning takes place this is where all the health and safety regulations are learned and also the underpinning. You’ll be taught all that’s involved with your chosen trade and what the working days are like for a painter and decorator. Your expert will demonstrate how to carry out different tasks before you enter the workshops.

The workshop is where the practical takes place and it’s the place where you will fully get to grips with your trade. The equipment you need is all included in your course so there are no worries with things like that, you can put all your concentration into your course.

What’s the average cost of a course?

Training centres are quite expensive but it all depends on how you see it. Training courses can be anywhere between £4,000 and £6,000. Like I say it depends o how you look at it, yes they are expensive but you have to remember it is your future you are investing in and once you are qualified you’ll be making so much money that these start up figures will be insignificant in the long run. Skilled workers are in high demand and so their wages are high so remember this when you are working out your options. Also remember that if you go self employed you’ll have the benefit of setting your own rates and the closer you are to London and the South East the higher your wages will be.

How’s about short intensive courses and long distance courses?

These are both good alternatives to training centres however I must point out that you have to be careful as many of them just don’t put enough time into covering the practical parts of your course. So you end up learning lots about your trade but haven’t been able to fully appreciate what your trade is all about practically and it’s this practical experience that’s necessary for your future career. So please make sure that the theory and practical sections are equally covered in your course and also make sure that they are industry recognised with City &Guilds for example.

Ok so that’s about it from me, as you can see training centres really are a great route into the construction industry, skilled workers are in high demand all over the UK and I really hope that you too will soon be one of them enjoying the rewards that come with working in such an exciting industry. Good luck!

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Painter and Decorator Qualifications

painter and decorator qualifications

Painters and decorators really do bring colour into people’s homes or business premises, they carry out the work that others can’t do either because they are working and just don’t have the time to do it themselves or it could simply be the fact that they simply haven’t got the artistic flair that is needed to carry out a job successfully.

Elderly people especially appreciate the work a painter and decorator does as they don’t want the worry of doing it themselves and then causing themselves an injury by going up a ladder for example. Painters have to use a wide range of coverings that will protect and enhance surfaces, these surfaces include, metal wood and plaster.

It’s a great skill to be involved with if you love working with your hands and are artistic.

To become a painter and decorator you’ll need to have good creative skills as well as great practical skills, painters and decorators also have to have a good eye for detail and must be able to work carefully. Sometimes a painter and decorator will have to work up heights so it would be great if this doesn’t bother you.

The majority of employers would like it if you has dome previous on site experience, you can get this experience either by becoming what’s known as a painter and decorator’s “mate” or labourer. You can also gain this experience by getting on an apprenticeship scheme, you’ll be trained up by an expert at their trade who will guide you all the way through your training and will get you right up to the standards that are required to enter into this exciting industry.

A painter and decorator’s work!

A painter and decorator works in domestic locations and also on industrial projects this could range from decorating a person’s home or on a larger scale they may have to apply heavy duty finishes to structures like bridges for example.

If a painter and decorator are working in a domestic location then they would be carrying out work using paint, wallpaper and varnish in order to decorate a person’s home to the way they want it.

 Tasks in the home would include:

  • Stripping off old wallpaper or paint
  • Measuring a surface area in order to work out how much paint you are going to use to complete a job
  • Prepare a surface with undercoat and primer ready for decorating
  • Fill holes or any cracks to make sure the surface is ready for decorating
  • Hang wallpaper
  • Apply layers of paint
  • Mixing paint to get the right colour, they do this either by hand or by using computerised colour matching equipment
  • Tidying up after a job has been successfully finished

With certain jobs you may have to apply some specialist finishes for example graining, marbling and rag rolling.

A painter and decorator will have to reach ceilings by working from a ladder or a raised platform. This is why you shouldn’t be bothered by heights.

If a painter and decorator is working on bridges or a ship for example they would carry out tasks including, removing the old paintwork with abrasive blasting methods, this has to be completed before they can apply the new coatings which include industrial paint spraying equipment. When working on locations like this a painter and decorator would have to wear a safety harness or use a cradle.

Remember that solvents and paints do give off fumes and so you would have to wear a protective mask on your face or you can use fume extraction equipment on certain jobs, if you are working in enclosed spaces.

How many hours do a painter and decorator work?

A painter and decorator will usually work 40 hours a week and that’s Mondays to Fridays. Of course extra hours will be available and you may have to work extra hours if you’re meeting a deadline. You will have to travel from site to site and also remember if you’re working for a company and not for yourself you may have to work away from home and this may involve overnight stays away from home. If you’re going to go self employed hen of course you can set your own rates, days you work and where you work if staying away from home just isn’t an option.

How much will I earn as a painter and decorator?

The starting salary for a painter and decorator is between £14,500 and £17,000 a year. The average salary is between £17,500 and £23,000 a year. If you’re a painter and decorator with supervisor duties or have specialist skills then you could earn over £23,000 a year.

You may also have overtime and also shift allowances and so these wages could be increased further and also if you’re going self employed then you have the added bonus of being able to set your own rates. Also remember that the closer you get to London and the South East the more money you’ll be earning.

What do I need to become a painter and decorator?

When an employer is looking for an employee they usually look for someone who has some experience at their trade, you could get this experience by looking to work for a painter and decorator as a “mate” or labourer. Then once you start working your employer may provide you with the opportunity to take further training.

You could also try and get on an apprenticeship scheme to get this experience where you’re trained up and guided by an expert at their trade.

You could also consider taking a college course or you could train via a training centre.

 Courses will include:

  • Level 1 Award/certificate in Basic Construction Skills (painting and decorating)
  • Level 1 Certificate in Construction Crafts (painting and decorating)
  • Level 1/2/3 Diploma in painting and decorating

If you would like more info on the painter and decorator courses that are available and the entry requirements then contact your local college or training centre.

Further development and training!

As soon as you begin working you could then take even more qualifications work based in order to develop your portfolio even further.

The qualifications are usually split into two areas of work. This does however depend on your job.

The two areas are:

  • Level 2/3 (NVQ) Diploma in Decorative Finishing and Painting Occupations Painter

This includes brush and roller techniques for exterior tasks and interior tasks, hanging wall coverings and fitting coverings, installing coving and ceiling pieces and specialised finishes.

  • Level 2/3 (NVQ) Diploma in Decorative Finishing and Industrial Painting Occupations

This includes the preparation of surfaces with specialist treatments, applying industrial finishes, paint spraying methods and abrasive blasting.

Construction Skills Certification Scheme

There are many building contractors who would like you to have a CSCS card before you can carry out work on their construction site. This CSCS card is your proof that you can carry out a job safely and efficiently with successful results.

In order to gain your CSCS card you must be able to do two things including:

 

  • You must pass the CITB Health, Safety and Environment test
  • You must be able to prove that you have the competence to carry out a job safely and successfully, your qualifications will prove this.

If you are currently working without any qualifications and you require a CSCS card then you could either use the on site assessment workshop or experienced worker practical assessment (EWPA) schemes. This way you’ll hopefully gain your qualifications and you can gain your CSCS card.

Traditional Building Skills Bursary Scheme

The aim of this scheme is to get skilled workers into trades and reduce the shortage of skilled workers that are working in the built heritage sector and traditional crafts. The scheme does this by organising work based training placements to eligible applicants and also by offering bursaries.

Visit the Traditional Building Skills Bursary Scheme website for more info on this.

Last going off!

So to sum up a painter and decorator should:

  • Be good at creative and practical skills
  • Have the ability to pay close attention to detail and be able to work carefully
  • Have the ability to work as part of a team or alone
  • Be good with heights and have a good sense of balance
  • Be aware of health and safety regulations.

Well that’s about it from me now, as I’m sure you can see becoming a painter and decorator is a fantastic career opportunity with good prospects. You’ll always be in high demand and with this comes peace of mind thanks to the job security that this trade offers.

So good luck with your training and I hope you gain your qualifications to be able to enter into this worthwhile and rewarding trade. All the very best from me!

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Painter and Decorator Apprenticeships

painter and decorator apprenticeships

Becoming a painter and decorator is a good career to be involved in as someone somewhere will always require to have their home or business premises painted or decorated. It’s a skill that’s very much in demand as not everyone has the patience and accuracy that’s required to complete a job successfully and with finishing touches.

Becoming a painter and decorator will see that you have a job for life which means job security and peace of mind as you’ll know that your skills and expertise are very much needed and not just here in the UK but throughout the world including countries like New Zealand, Australia and Canada to name just three.

What a painter and decorator does is they use a wide range of coverings that will enhance and also protect surfaces in your home or any other location. Surfaces may include wood, metal and plaster.

This job is ideally suited to someone who has plenty of patience, enjoys carrying out practical tasks and likes being artistic.

You’ll need good practical skills to become a painter and also good creative skills and you’ll need to have good attention to detail. Painters may also have to work at height, so it would be good if you can cope well at height.

Most employers look out for someone who already has some experience, so in order to get this experience you could become a painter and decorator’s labourer. Another way to gain experience is by an apprenticeship scheme, where you’re trained up by an expert at their trade. Let’s look more closely at what an apprenticeship scheme is really all about.

What exactly is an apprenticeship scheme?

Apprenticeship schemes are for anyone who wants to enter into the construction industry in this case it’s becoming a painter and decorator. You are trained up by an expert at their trade who will guide you through your training passing down all the skills and knowledge that they themselves would have gained throughout their own careers. You can only imagine just how much expertise they have and are willing to share with you so that you too can become just as knowledgeable and skilled in your own career.

You will be trained up so that you meet with the current industry standards which will prove that you have all the knowledge and skills required to carry out a job safely and competently. At the end of your training you’ll receive your certificate which again is your proof that you can carry out a job successfully.

Apprenticeships are best suited to those who are just out of school the majority of apprentices are between the ages of 16 and 24 anyone over these ages will find themselves struggling to be accepted on an apprenticeship scheme, it’s not totally impossible but just remember you probably will find it harder to be accepted than those within this age range.

Apprenticeships usually take between 2 and 4 years to complete and your training is split between practical and theory lessons. Obviously the practical sides of training will take place when you’re out and about with your boss carrying out jobs around people’s homes or other locations. The theory all takes place in the classrooms of your local college or training centre. On completion of the apprenticeship you will have your full Painter and Decorator qualifications.

You really should value this time spent training with your boss they really are there to help and guide you and remember this is an opportunity not given to many, so please make the most of it, you can’t learn everything by a textbook, experience is really the key. There is also another hidden bonus when being trained up as an apprentice that you may not have thought of yet, just imagine how many different people you’ll be meeting with, people like tradesmen, construction workers and suppliers and it’s these people who may in the future be able to help you in your own career as a painter and decorator.

So like I say not only are you being trained up by an expert at their trade and are gaining all their knowledge and skills but you’re also meeting with people who could potentially help set you up at your own career. Not everyone has the chance so please make the most of it and enjoy this time.

Apprentices are paid as they train and are fully entitled to holidays

Apprentices are fully entitled to at least the minimum wage which is £2.73 an hour, to get this amount you have to be between 16 and 18 and you’ll also get this amount if you’re aged 19 or over and are currently in your first year of training. What you’ll receive above these figures basically comes down to your boss and how much extras they are willing to offer you.

These figures are based on the hours you’ll be working, which is usually 30 hours a week for apprentices and also includes any other training that’s part of your apprenticeship scheme, which is usually carried out once a week.

Apprentices are fully entitled to holidays too you’ll have at least 20 paid holiday days a year and also any bank holidays.

How do you go about getting on an apprenticeship scheme?

This can be the hardest part of it all just getting accepted, unfortunately it doesn’t come easy. There are only a few allocated spaces given to apprenticeships each year and I’m sure as you can imagine competition is very fierce as everyone who’s just out of school and wanting to enter into the construction industry really tries to get on an apprenticeship scheme.

You don’t need any formal qualifications to become an apprentice, but what I would say is that you really do need the determination to succeed and try your hardest. Also you do have to have normal colour vision.

So yes it’s a fantastic opportunity but it can be tricky being accepted. Remember the age limit is between 16 and 24 for apprentices, you can be accepted over theses ages but it does get much harder. It’s not impossible so it’s always worth ringing up a few painter and decorators in your area to see if they are planning on taking on apprentices. If they aren’t taking on you never know they may know of someone who is and you might just be one of the lucky ones. So yes it is more difficult but it’s not impossible.

What can I do if I’m not accepted?

If the worst comes to the worst and you’ve tried all avenues and you still can’t get accepted the first thing to do is to not give yourself a hard time, remember there are only a few spaces each year and competition is high, just as long as you’ve tried don’t be too disappointed there are many other routes into the painter and decorator trade. These other routes include college courses and also training centres. Training centres are a fantastic way into the construction industry and the allow you to really get hands on at your chosen trade. Training is split between theory and practical with the theory lessons taking place in the air conditioned classrooms and the practical takes place in the workshops, where all the magic happens, this is the place where all that learning about your chosen trade can be put into practice. Training centre are located all over the UK so there is bound to be close to you. Your local college will also have painter and decorator courses available which are another great option. SO don’t be too disappointed about not getting accepted on an apprenticeship scheme there really are other good options out there equally as good. So keep on trying and you wills succeed.

For lots more help and advice!

For much more info on apprenticeships the government has a “National Apprenticeship Helpline” where you will be provided with more advice and help call them on 08000150600.

Or alternatively there’s a website available with more info and you can request an information pack visit www.apprenticeships.org.uk

 

Well that’s me off then, I’ve come to the end of my article on painter and decorator apprenticeships. As you can see it’s a great way into the construction industry and will open many doors for you and your career. Just don’t be too disheartened if you aren’t accepted as like I say there are many other great routes into your chosen trade. So good luck with it all!

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